Limon Mediterranean Cuisine

Our Kitchen  is largely the heritage of Ottoman cuisine, which can be described as a fusion and refinement of Central Asian, Middle Eastern, Eastern European and Balkan cuisines. Turkish cuisine has in turn influenced those and other neighbouring cuisines, including those of Southeast Europe (Balkans), Central Europe, and Western Europe.The Turks fused various culinary traditions of their realm with influences from Levantine cuisines, along with traditional Turkic elements from Central Asia (such as yogurt and mantı), creating a vast array of specialities—many with strong regional associations.

Turkish cuisine varies across the country. The cooking of Istanbul, Bursa, Izmir, and rest of the Asia Minor region inherits many elements of Ottoman court cuisine, with a lighter use of spices, a preference for rice over bulgur, koftes and a wider availability of vegetable stews (türlü), eggplant, stuffed dolmas and fish. The cuisine of the Black Sea Region uses fish extensively, especially the Black Sea anchovy (hamsi) and includes maize dishes. The cuisine of the southeast (e.g. Urfa, Gaziantep, and Adana) is famous for its variety of kebabs, mezes and dough-based desserts such as baklavaşöbiyetkadayıf, and künefe.

Our Specialty comes from  in the western parts of Turkey, where olive trees grow abundantly, olive oil is the major type of oil used for cooking.The cuisines of the Aegean, Marmara and  regions are rich in vegetables, herbs, and fish. Central Anatolia has many famous specialties, such as keşkekmantı (especially from Kayseri) and gözleme. Food names directly cognate with mantıare found also in Chinese (mantou or steamed bun) and Korean cuisine (mandu).

A specialty’s name sometimes includes that of a city or region, either in or outside of Turkey, and may refer to the specific technique or ingredients used in that area. For example, the difference between Urfa kebap and Adana kebap is the thickness of the skewer and the amount of hot pepper that the kebab contains. Urfa kebap is less spicy and thicker than Adana kebap. Although meat-based foods such as kebabs are the mainstay in Turkish cuisine as presented in foreign countries, native Turkish meals largely center around rice, vegetables, and bread.

Mediterranean Diet by Limon

A traditional Mediterranean diet has been shown to have significant health benefits. But can you follow it if you live nowhere near a Greek island?

We’re always being told a traditional Mediterranean-style diet is an incredibly healthy way to eat.

Recent studies have shown this eating pattern can reduce your risk of dementia and reverse symptoms of depression and anxiety.

What you might eat in a day:

  • Breakfast: Slice sourdough bread with chopped tomatoes, red onion, fresh herbs with crumbled feta and drizzle of olive oil and balsamic vinegar. Slice of melon. Turkish coffee (or espresso).
  • Snack: fresh fruit (pear, small bunch grapes, a couple of figs) or small handful of nuts (walnuts, almonds, hazelnuts).
  • Lunch: Mediterranean vegetable bake (Briami) with small serve of rice.
  • Afternoon snack: Turkish plain natural yoghurt drizzled with honey and a few crushed walnuts.
  • Dinner: Baked or grilled snapper (or other fish) with salad of cooked leafy greens drizzled with olive oil and lemon juice. Small glass of wine.
  • After dinner: small plate of fresh fruit to share (melon, grapes, figs, stone fruits).

As well as its proven benefits in preventing heart attacks and promoting a longer life generally, it has specifically been shown to help ward off diabetes as well as bowel and prostate cancers.

But adopting a truly Mediterranean approach to eating, especially that which stems from Mediterranean coast in Turkey , is not as simple as many cookbooks would have us believe.

While plenty of recipes are promoted as Mediterranean, they aren’t necessarily the ones research has shown to be so good for us, says Catherine I. from La Trobe University in Melbourne. In fact in most cases they’re not, she says.

That’s because cookbooks tend to focus on festive foods and desserts from the region, says the head of School of Allied Health and Professor of Nutrition at La Trobe University, who is an expert on the Mediterranean diet.

“When people think of the Mediterranean diet, they always think of the Kebabs  and all the other meat dishes,” she says.

But the diet, made famous by the ground-breaking health studies dating back to the 1960s, was a peasant-style diet that was largely vegetarian, she says.